Rural Turkana Food Environment: Consumers' Perspectives Irene Induli, Marisa Nowicki, Francis Odhiambo Oduor, Céline Termote

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Rural Turkana Food Environment: Consumers’ Perspectives Irene Induli, Marisa Nowicki, Francis Odhiambo Oduor, Céline Termote

The study was conducted in two sub counties of Turkana County: Loima and Turkana South sub counties. H ousehold food sources were assessed. Data was collected in 18 households across 10 community health units (CHUs) that were randomly sampled for the main intervention study on farm, markets and diet diversity. In-depth interviews were used to collect the data.

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RESULTS: FOOD SOURCES

Markets and shops Own farm production Collecting from the wild Barter trade- exchanging with other community members Food aid donations Gifts from family and friends

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MARKETS/SHOPS

T he most common source of food mentioned 32 times in the discussions on household and community's main source of food.

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OWN FARM PRODUCTION

All study participants were involved in agricultural production. 3 practised crop farming, 4 animal farming, and 11 practised both crop and animal farming. A total of 18 plant and animal species were mentioned. S orghum and cowpeas are the most planted crops, while goat and sheep are the most domesticated animals.

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MOBILE VENDORS

Residents acquired food from walking vendors and those selling on trucks within their villages. Truck vendors were preferred because they sold food at relatively lower prices than markets.

Silver: onemr LODW

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READY TO EAT FOODS

boiled maize samosa roast meat roasted meat vegeta bles meat sour milk chip githerügali bean rice chapatti tea—two pilau mandaAoughnut

Apart from foods cooked and consumed at home, the respondents also utilise foods that have been prepared out of their homes. All interviewed households consume ready to eat food

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WILD EDIBLE FOODS

Wild food consumption was common among all participants, though most mentioned the consumption to be among other community members and not themselves. Fruits, vegetables and tubers. and tubers.

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CONCLUSION

N on conventional food sources like the wild and barter trade seem to be common among the rural Turkana residents; and should therefore be considered during assessments of local food environments. To fully utilize wild edible foods, nutrition interventions should include the component of nutrition education to enlighten community members on what food items are available, their nutrition value, and how to prepare them.

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Deutsche Gesellschaft Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH

Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development

CGIAR RESEARCH PROGRAM ON Agriculture for and Health Led by IFPRI

University of Nairobi

zef Center for Development Research University of Bonn

Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

In partnership with:

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