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POPULAR LITERATURE

POEM

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Prepared by: Corpuz , Michelle E.

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Sonnet 10: Death, Be Not Proud ,

By: John Donne :

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OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the students are able to:

interpret the meaning of Sonnet 10: Death, Be Not Proud; examine the literary and poetic devices in the poem; a ppreciate the popular literature poem Sonnet 10: Death, Be Not Proud; and create their own sonnet.

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John Donne | Anecdotes | Paw Prints

JOHN DONNE John Donne was born in 1572 in London, England. He is known as the founder of the Metaphysical Poets. Holy Sonnets, also called Divine Meditations or Divine Sonnets.

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John Donne | Anecdotes | Paw Prints

Series of 19 devotional poems by John Donne that were published posthumously in 1633 in the first edition of Songs and Sonnets. Death, Be Not Proud, a sonnet by John Donne, is one of the 19 Holy Sonnets. This devotional lyric directly addresses death, raging defiantly against its perceived haughtiness. The theme, seen throughout Donne’s poetry, is that death is unable to corrupt the eternal soul.

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Death, be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so; For those whom thou think’st thou dost overthrow Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me. From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be, Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow, And soonest our best men with thee do go, Rest of their bones, and soul’s delivery. Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men, And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell, And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well And better than thy stroke; why swell’st thou then? One short sleep past, we wake eternally And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.

S Sonnet 10:

Death, Be Not Proud

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ANALYSIS

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Lines 1-2

Death, be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;

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Lines 1-2

Lines 1-2 Analysis

The speaker creates a personified version of death by talking to him directly. He paints a picture of Death as an arrogant being, that is need to be humbled. The speaker takes on the part of the one who has to humble this being. He tells him that he ought not to be so proud, people have feared Death and called him “mighty and dreadful”. The speaker, however, with a voice of absolute authority on the matter, simply states, “thou art not so”. The poet uses the literary tactic of apostrophe to drive home his point. Apostrophe occurs when a writer addresses a subject who cannot respond. Death, though adequately personified, cannot respond to the accusations of the speaker.

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For those whom thou think’st thou dost overthrow Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

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Lines 1-2

Lines 3-4 Analysis

The speaker accuses death of having illusions of grandeur. He claims that while Death  thinks  that he has the power to kill, he actually does not. The speaker first humbles Death by telling him that his idea that he has the power to overthrow lives is simply an illusion, and that he has no such power at all. Then, to further humiliate Death, the speaker calls him “Poor Death”. It sounds almost as if the speaker is making fun of Death for having lived under the illusion that he had any sort of power over life or death.

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Lines 1-2

Lines 3-4 Analysis

Then, he addresses Death in a more personal manner, challenging him by saying, “yet canst thou kill me”. It seems dangerous for one to threaten death in this way. However, knowledge of John Donne’s background and ideologies can give some insight into the speaker’s confidence here. Though everyone knows that physical death does indeed occur, the speaker is challenging Death in a different way. He uses the Christian theology of eternity to taunt Death by telling him, essentially, “Even if you take my physical body, you can never truly kill me.”

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From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be, Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,

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Lines 5-6 Analysis

With these lines, the speaker compares death to “rest and sleep” and even uses the word “pleasure” to describe how one should feel about death. Just as a restful night of sleep brings pleasure, so should death. The speaker implies that sleep is simply a small glimpse of Death. Thus, there is nothing to fear in death, for death will bring something like a pleasurable sleep.

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PIPI #5 | by @atelierie on twitter on We Heart It

PIPI #5 | by @atelierie on twitter on We Heart It

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And soonest our best men with thee do go, Rest of their bones, and soul’s delivery.

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Lines 7-8 Analysis

Here, the speaker says that the best men seem to experience death the soonest. While others have long questioned why it seems as if the best people die soonest, the speaker offers an answer here, suggesting that the best among men deserve to experience the peaceful rest of death sooner, without having to endure the agonies of a long life on the earth.

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Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men, And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,

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Lines 9-10 Analysis

The speaker takes on a stronger tone and begins to taunt Death with more ferocity than he did at first. He has taunted Death, telling him that he is not to be feared, but rather that he is a slave to the will of fate and men, and that as a lowly slave, his companions are the even lowlier beings such as sickness and war. The speaker certainly feels authority over Death, and he passes this feeling along to his readers when he puts Death in his place by talking down to him.

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PIPI #5 | by @atelierie on twitter on We Heart It

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And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well And better than thy stroke; why swell’st thou then?

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Lines 11-12 Analysis

The speaker continues to taunt Death, even more, saying that all he brings is a little sleep, and he doesn’t even do that as well as some other bringers of rest such as “poppy” or “charms”. This comparison further portrays Death as something not only weak, but even pleasurable. The speaker questions Death, asking “why swell’st thou then?” He is asking him why he is so puffed up with pride, when he cannot even do his job, as well as others, can.

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Lines13-14

One short sleep past, we wake eternally And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.

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Lines 13-14 Analysis

With these final lines, the speaker reveals exactly why he has been taunting death so relentlessly. Although it is obvious that Death is real, and that people who experience Death do not come back to earth, the speaker reveals his reasons for claiming that Death is weak and easily overcome. He claims that Death is only “one short sleep” and that those who experience Death “wake eternally”. Then, he claims that “death shall be no more”. Finally, he tells Death, “thou shalt die”. The speaker has not only told Death that he has no real power over anyone, but that he will experience the end of himself when all wake in eternity and death will be no more.

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THEME

The main theme is the powerlessness of death. The poem includes the feelings of the speaker, mocking death's position and suggesting that death is unworthy of fear or awe. Death gives birth to our souls, according to him. It should not, therefore, consider itself strong or superior, as 'death' is not invincible. Similar to sleep and rest, the poet even deems death an enormous pleasure. The poem foreshadows the realistic depiction of death and believes strongly in everlasting life after death as well.

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Analysis of the literary devices of the poem

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Personification: Donne has personified death throughout the poem, stating it should not be proud. Being proud is a human quality. Death is given a human quality of having feelings and emotions. Metaphor: There are three metaphors in this poem. The first is used in the opening line “Death, be not proud.” Here death is compared to a proud man. The second is used in the ninth line, “Thou art slave to fate.” In the last line in an extended metaphor where death is compared to the non-existent or unrealistic object.

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Alliteration: The use of / th / in “And better than thy stroke; why swell’st thou then” and /m/ sound in “Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow.” Metonymy: In this poem, “poppy” and “charms” are used to produce gentle sleep or death.

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Assonance: The sound of /a/ in “Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,” and the sound of /e/ in “And soonest our best men with thee do go.” Irony: Irony means a statement that may mean something different from, or the opposite of, what is written. Irony often expresses something other than their literal intention, often in a humorous way. An example of irony in the poem is “Death, thou shalt die”.

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Poetic devices on the poem

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Sonnet The poem of John Donne is a Sonnet. A sonnet is a fourteen-line poem in which the same idea runs throughout the poem. In this sonnet, John Donne has combined the Shakespearian and Petrarchan style. The division of the sonnet reflects the Shakespearian structure, whereas the rhyme scheme shows the structure of Petrarchan sonnet .

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Rhyme Scheme The rhyme scheme of the first two quatrains is typically ABBA, and the rhyme scheme for the third quatrain is CDDCEE. Meter Most of the verses of this poem are written in iambic pentameter in which unstressed syllable is followed by a stressed syllable, as it is stated, “from rest,” “and”. However, the meter fluctuates, as the poem progresses.

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Style and Form John Donne’s “Holy Sonnet 10” follows the Elizabethan/Shakespearean sonnet form in that it is made up of three quatrains and a concluding couplet. However, Donne has chosen the Italian/Petrarchan sonnet rhyme scheme of ABBA for the first two quatrains, grouping them into an octet typical of the Petrarchan form. He switches rhyme scheme in the third quatrain to CDDC, and then the couplet rhymes EE as usual.

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Language of Sonnet 10: Death, Be N ot Proud

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Monosyllables The language of Death be not Proud is striking, though the vocabulary is not unusual. The voice is helped by the unusually large proportion of monosyllabic words employed, much higher than normal: eight out of nine in the first and ninth lines; Death is addressed in words totally opposite to those usually employed: ‘poor', ‘slave', 'nor yet can thou kill me'.

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Tone of Sonnet 10: Death, Be N ot Proud

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Defiant and Confident Although the topic of the poem is negative, the poem is overwhelmingly positive because the author is putting down death and says that death doesn’t have any real power against human souls.

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Mood of Sonnet 10: Death, Be N ot Proud

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Mocking and Challenging Throughout the poem, the speaker challenged and mocked death by stating that it is not the “mighty and dreadful” aspect of life that people are afraid of, but as an escape from life where people can find peace after death.

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The End of presentation!