SUPPORTING STUDENTS' INTERACTIONS using PAIR WORK

Published on
Scene 1 (0s)

SUPPORTING STUDENTS’ INTERACTIONS using PAIR WORK

Eszter Kovács-Kószó Supervisor : József Kosztolányi Szeged, Hungary

Szegedi Tudományegyetem | Magyar Tudományos Művek Tára

Study in Hungary - Basic information about Hungary

Scene 2 (13s)

Aim: support teachers to teach better.

?

Scene 3 (23s)

The teacher

Gifted

Special needs

Middle

Secondary school

15yrs

16yrs

17yrs

18yrs

336 BEST "Teacher Icon" IMAGES, STOCK PHOTOS & VECTORS | Adobe Stock

Attitude

Willing to change

Strong teaching routine

Lonely

336 BEST "Teacher Icon" IMAGES, STOCK PHOTOS & VECTORS | Adobe Stock

ACHIEVEMENT

MATHEMATICS

Scene 4 (51s)

Aim: support teachers to teach better.

?

Offer a method & Help to adapt

Scene 5 (1m 2s)

The chosen method: sage and scribe

Pair work – with ONE pen Sage : who solves the problem Scribe : who writes They switch roles often Scribe : correct , help

Scene 6 (1m 16s)

Application during the lesson

Individual work

Sage and Scribe method

But DO NOT CHANGE anything ELSE

SAME lesson plan SAME instructions SAME tasks SAME time management

Scene 7 (1m 28s)

Effect of using Sage & Scribe

TRADITIONAL CLASSROOM Teacher Frontal instruction Students ‚ Always ’ work alone Rarely participate in classroom discussions

SAGE & SCRIBE METHOD Teacher Not demanding More feedback Students Help to think aloud Prevent ‚ bad ’ pair work Two individual next to each other Coppying the ‚ cleverer ’ Get to know others ’ thoughts Got peers ’ feedback Rarely participate in classroom discussions

RESULT Teacher Inspired by students More students orientent instruction Students Acitve Less bored Happier

Scene 8 (1m 51s)

Experiments

11 preexperiments Ages : 10 to 17 years old students Diverse classes in terms of mathematical ability. Main experiment Hardworking , had good grades , but not gifted 16 members in a class 15 years old Self made questionnaires Interviews ( short , long , teacher , students ) Audio recordings from each pair – transcipts are in progress

Scene 9 (2m 10s)

ANALIzATion

M athematical significant O pportunities to built on S tudents T hinking ( MOST , L eatham e t al . ( 2015) ) Goal: find a general rule & help the teacher Regulating & key activities (Dekker et al.) Hypothesis: they increase Unstructured pair work vs . Sage & Scribe method Dinamic of the classroom discussion Observation , interviews , quastionaire : promisig results

A képen asztal látható Automatikusan generált leírás

Scene 10 (2m 30s)

Results - Students

Questionnaire – 5 point Lickert-scale Mathematically interesting moments from the partner – most of them usually have Correcting the other – sometimes Missed the method after the experiment Result : closer relationship with the teacher Students were less stressed

Lolyality to role Activeness Deep thinking Helpfullness Usefulness of the method Climate of the lesson 3.6428571428571437 4.5714285714285712 4.0714285714285712 4.25 4.0769230769230766 4.2142857142857144

Scene 11 (2m 53s)

Teacher ’ perspective

National Education Policy will address crisis of quality in Technical Education: AICTE Chairman - The Indian Wire

She liked it  Good motivator to pay attention Students were shy The Sage should write also – expcept lessons for practice . Mixing pairs is important Did not slow down the lesson

Scene 12 (3m 10s)

References

Thomas R. Guskey (2002) Professional Development and Teacher Change, Teachers and Teaching , 8:3, 381-391, DOI: 10.1080/135406002100000512 Leatham, K. R., Peterson, B. E., Stockero , S. L., & Van Zoest , L. R. (2015). Conceptualizing Mathematically Significant Pedagogical Opportunities to Build on Student Thinking. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education , 46(1), 88-124. Wood, M. B., & Kalinec , C. A. (2012). Student talk and opportunities for mathematical learning in small group interactions. International Journal of Educational Research , 51–52, 109–127. doi:10.1016/j.ijer.2011.12.008 Jennifer M. Langer-Osuna. (2017). Authority, Identity, and Collaborative Mathematics. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 48 (3), 237-247. doi:10.5951/jresematheduc.48.3.0237 Wigfield , A., & Meece , J. L. (1988). Math anxiety in elementary and secondary school students. Journal of Educational Psychology, 80 (2), 210–216. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0663.80.2.210 Dekker , R. Elshout-Mohr , M. and Wood, T. (2006) ' How children regulate their own collaborative learning ', Educational Studies in Mathematics 62(1), 57-79.

Thomas R. Guskey (2002) Professional Development and Teacher Change, Teachers and Teaching , 8:3, 381-391, DOI: 10.1080/135406002100000512 Leatham, K. R., Peterson, B. E., Stockero , S. L., & Van Zoest , L. R. (2015). Conceptualizing Mathematically Significant Pedagogical Opportunities to Build on Student Thinking. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education , 46(1), 88-124. Wood, M. B., & Kalinec , C. A. (2012). Student talk and opportunities for mathematical learning in small group interactions. International Journal of Educational Research , 51–52, 109–127. doi:10.1016/j.ijer.2011.12.008 Jennifer M. Langer-Osuna. (2017). Authority, Identity, and Collaborative Mathematics. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 48 (3), 237-247. doi:10.5951/jresematheduc.48.3.0237 Wigfield , A., & Meece , J. L. (1988). Math anxiety in elementary and secondary school students. Journal of Educational Psychology, 80 (2), 210–216. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0663.80.2.210 Dekker , R. Elshout-Mohr , M. and Wood, T. (2006) ' How children regulate their own collaborative learning ', Educational Studies in Mathematics 62(1), 57-79.

Scene 13 (4m 16s)

Exclamation mark on a yellow background

Thank you for your attention

Supported by the ÚNKP-20-3 - SZTE-533 New National Excellence Program of the Ministry for Innovation and Technology from the source of the National Research, Development and Innovation Fund .